AI in the News (AAAI)

Artificial Intelligence News from AAAI

  1. Robots recognizes humans in disaster environments

    Through a computational algorithm, a team of researchers from the University of Guadalajara (UDG) in Mexico, developed a neural network that allows a small robot to detect different patterns, such as images, fingerprints, handwriting, faces, bodies, voice frequencies and DNA sequences. Nancy Guadalupe Arana Daniel, researcher at the University Center of Exact and Engineering Sciences (CUCEI) at the UDG, focused on the recognition of human silhouettes in disaster situations.

    ScienceDaily AI
  2. Machine-Learning Maestro Michael Jordan on the Delusions of Big Data and Other Huge Engineering Efforts

    The overeager adoption of big data is likely to result in catastrophes of analysis comparable to a national epidemic of collapsing bridges. Hardware designers creating chips based on the human brain are engaged in a faith-based undertaking likely to prove a fool's errand.

    IEEE Spectrum Robotics Channel
  3. Ask Watson or Siri: Artificial intelligence is as elusive as ever

    In 1966, some Massachusetts Institute of Technology researchers reckoned that they could develop computer vision as a summer project, perhaps even get a few smart undergrads to complete the task. The world has been working on the problem ever since.

    PCWorld
  4. Listen up: It's time to rename the smartphone

    Last year, former presidential candidate and renegade futurist Newt Gingrich posted a three-minute video imploring viewers to help him come up with a name for his "handheld computer. " He was tired, he said, of the term "cell phone," and wanted to find a name that more accurately reflects the "change that has taken place" in telephony technology.

    USA Today - Tech Headlines
  5. What is the mysterious Magic Leap?

    -- It may have more than a half-billion dollars in the bank and the backing of tech titans like Google, as well as the investors with some of Silicon Valley's deepest pockets. You've probably never heard of Magic Leap, a startup so secretive they're not even telling the public who is on their team.

    CNN Technology